Endurance Series

A series of portraits from the 3BGD HALF DISTANCE TRIATHLON

1.9 km swimming + 90 km cycling + 21.1 km running = 113 km total

 

This is a part of my endurance series I am working on. I set up the paper background and lighting next to the finishing line and invited the runners who finished the race for a photo shoot. Some declined, but most agreed, although terminally exhausted. Some of them knew about the shoot out beforehand, but most did not until I met them at the finishing line. I took the photos under a tree as the only logical place for my set-up and therefore had minor technical "problems" with the sunlight, as can be seen on the background and the faces of some of the runners. All in all, it turned out to be an interesting series of character photographs, even more so bearing in mind the ordeal they just finished.  Complete series available in my Personal project menu. Enjoy.   

Mine: Rudnik & Srebrenica


It was the end of 2014, when a client engaged me to make a series of photographs in two mines, one in Rudnik and one in Srebrenica. We had a deal to have the series finished in two days, which included a day trip from Belgrade to Srebrenica and another trip to Rudnik on the following day. I was quite excited about this engagement, imagining an underground space like an unfinished subway station with unique shooting options. We had a very comfortable trip in the company SUV and a warm welcome at the mines. After signing the mandatory release papers we put on the equipment and went into the shafts. The ceiling was extremely low. We had no lighting equipment apart from the helmet lamps. After 200 meters I turned around and saw a speck of light in the distance. That was the entrance we used. At that point I succumbed to panic and my pulse rushed, but as our group moved along I found comfort in the fact that some people come here to work shifts every day. After another 50 meters I was OK, and as we went deeper I was even more comfortable with my new surroundings. The panic attack went unnoticed because of the dark. On the following day in Rudnik I was as comfortable as waiting at a metro station. The wholes series was done using only the light available on site, as we could not carry the heavy lighting equipment for 45 minutes it took us to get to the shooting site. I got all assistance I needed from the miners. It was funny directing them where to stand and how to turn in order to use their helmet lamps as makeshift photo lighting. All in all, the location was deep and difficult, but I managed to bring back some good shots. 

Bike Mechanic

 

We talked about the Schleck brothers and their weight, about Chris Froom and his cycling posture, about likeable Sagan and many local heroes who never made in the world of cycling. We mostly talked about bicycle cleaning and the right adjustment of bike brakes. He has a mechanic shop of only 2 square meters, but he also has a dotted jersey designed by Mario Schifano for 1989 Tour de France. He showed me his training log in a notebook and ten years worth of training in it. He needs no Garmin. And my bike is now lying in a tub, not in a bath soak, but in degreaser, although Zoki insists on petrol :)

As a matter of fact, we talked about passion.         

Fencing time with Aleksandra Jovanovic

Portrait session with fencing coach Aleksandra.

Corporate lifestyle in glimpses

Towards the end of 2015, I had a chance to shoot for the Netherlands-based Betabit software company. My task was to capture glimpses of their employees’ vibrant and diverse lifestyles in different corporate and urban settings. 

 

Over the course of 5 days, we scouted for locations and shot series of images in the impressive 500-kilometer radius ( Utrecht, Oosterhout, Eindhoven, Rotterdam, Amsterdam ). At all the carefully selected indoors and outdoors settings, I attempted to make full use and play with the available light. Patient Betabit employees sat for dynamic individual and group portraits, completed everyday activities and shared favorite and most frequently visited spots – all of which is documented in the series.

 

I would specially like to thank one of the best assistants I have had the privilege to work with, Marie-Paule, without whom none of this would be possible.